Coin Collecting

  1. The Susan B. Anthony Dollar 40 Years After Its Debut

    The Susan B. Anthony Dollar 40 Years After Its Debut

    The story of modern U.S. dollar coins is mostly one of failure in terms of circulating issues and one of mixed results as a numismatic collectible. American consumers have largely rejected the coins for commerce, preferring to use the dollar bill. As for collectors, some of these coins, such as the first, the Eisenhower dollar, remain quite popular with collectors, while others never really took off with them. The most famous – some would say infamous – example of a flop in both regards is the Susan B. Anthony dollar, which debuted 40 years ago on July 2, 1979. The coin was conceived as a solution to the failure of the Eisenhower dollar, which was issued into circulation from 1971 to 1978, due to its large size and heavy weight. Ike dollar ...
  2. Mints Around the World Are Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Mission and the Moon Landing

    Mints Around the World Are Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Mission and the Moon Landing

    July 20, 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the famous day in 1969 when Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped on to the surface of the moon, achieving a goal that had been dreamed about for centuries by astronomers and scientists.  This event has continued to capture the imagination of the world ever since. The moon landing and what Armstrong and fellow astronauts Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins learned about the moon while they were there forever changed the course of history and the evolution of science. It led to all kinds of discoveries, the development of new industries and to the amazing progress in space exploration that has taken place since then, whose next phases are expected to involve a mission to the red planet Mars and a possible return to the moon. The Apollo 11 mission is un ...
  3. A Spotlight on the Royal Mint: Sovereigns, Britannias, and Beyond

    A Spotlight on the Royal Mint: Sovereigns, Britannias, and Beyond

    The Royal Mint of the United Kingdom is one of the world’s oldest and most important mints with over 1,100 years of experience. It produces all the nation’s circulating coins, as well as bullion and commemorative coinage and medals. It has also minted circulating coins for over 100 issuing authorities around the world.  Historical overview Coinage in Great Britain dates to the second century BC when Celtic tribes first introduced coins to the region. During the Roman rule of Britain, the Romans established mints all over the area, including in London, but that ended with the end of Roman rule.  N ...
  4. Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

    Commemorating the 75th Anniversary of D-Day

    A Tangible Connection to the "Longest Day" In June 1940, Axis forces accomplished what their leader, Adolph Hitler, called “the most famous victory in history” with the fall of France. The following year, Axis forces invaded the Soviet Union, and the United States joined the war. Joseph Stalin, then leader of the Soviet Union, pressed for Allied forces to open a western front, but those forces instead engaged in the Mediterranean, in both Africa and in Europe, rather than launching a full-on assault. Finally, in May 1943, attendees of the Trident Conference decided to launch such an assault in France. Planning for Operation Overlord began, and the assault began on what is today known as “D-Day” on June 6, 1944. Covert Measures and Redirection One of the most important aspects of D-Day was the deception leading up to it ...
  5. A Brief History of the American Cent

    A Brief History of the American Cent

    As the lowest denomination circulating coin issued, the cent, which is the proper numismatic term for coins that many call pennies, was the first coin (along with half cents) struck by the U.S. Mint beginning in 1793. Made using hand-engraved dies, those first cents, as well as all the other types issued until 1857, are known as large cents and have a diameter similar to that of half dollars. The low face value of the first cents meant that they circulated widely, which helped to reinforce for the general population the idea that the American republic had arrived. Large Cents ...
  6. The West Point Mint: A Giant of American Coinage

    The West Point Mint: A Giant of American Coinage

    The West Point Mint was built during the Great Depression in 1937 and opened its doors as the West Point Bullion Depository the following year. It was nicknamed “The Fort Knox of Silver” because it was built to store silver. The mint has a fascinating history, including half a century prior to its designation as an official US Mint. Today, it produces some of America’s most important bullion and collectable coinage as it continues to add to its rich numismatic tradition. Humble Origins and Beyond One of the most important chapters in the mint’s history was written during World War II. The Lend-Lease Act, which passed in 1941, permitted the President of the United States to provide military aid during World War II, including prior to the nation’s formal entry into the war. The West Point Mint ended up loaning silver not only to foreign nations but also to American industry and the Atomic Energy Commission in 1942. This proved vital to the Allied war efforts ...

Latest News

  1. Low Mintage 2019-S Enhanced Reverse Proof Silver Eagle from the United States Mint

    Low Mintage 2019-S Enhanced Reverse Proof Silver Eagle from the United States Mint

    Towards the end of the summer of 2019, with little fanfare the United States Mint added a product to its product schedule, a second 2019-dated Enhanced Reverse Proof American Silver Eagle following the one issued on July 3 as part of the U.S.-Canada Pride of Two Nations set. That set included a 2019-W Enhanced Reverse Proof Silver Eagle – the first coin ever issued with that finish, which has “the same frosted background as a standard Reverse Proof, but different design element finishes.” In particular, the Enhanced Reverse Proof “has the same frosted background as a reverse proof coin, but what sets it apart are the multiple polished and frosted finishes applied to different isolated design elements. The selective polishing and frosting dramatically enhances the visual ...
  2. New for 2020: The Royal Canadian Mint's Peace Dollar

    New for 2020: The Royal Canadian Mint's Peace Dollar

    New for 2020: The Royal Canadian Mint's Peace Dollar World War I was one of the bloodiest conflicts in human history. It also happened to be among the first wars that was brought home to those not on the frontlines through photos and videos. The entire world celebrated peace when it finally ended. The U.S Mint got in on the festivities with Anthony de Francisci’s Peace Dollar, which made its debut in 1921. 99 years later, Canada issued a Peace Dollar ...
  3. Warriors of Numismatics: A Fascinating Look into History

    Warriors of Numismatics: A Fascinating Look into History

    Many economists and historians could reasonably make the case that the history of the world is the history of money. From the debasement of currency in the Roman Empire to the rise of the ‘sound pound,’ money has played a central role in the rise and fall of countries throughout the world. It is little wonder, then, that those who are interested in coin collecting tend to have a deep interest in history. Important as money has been to world history, its value and who holds it, have been largely determined in war. The Babylonians, the Japanese, the Russians, and countless other civilizations built themselves largely on the backs of those whom they conquered, while the likes of the Iroquois and the Spartans continue to be remembered long after their peaks thanks to their ferocity. Warriors of History ...
  4. U.S Mint Continues American Liberty Series

    U.S Mint Continues American Liberty Series

    On August 15 the U.S. Mint will begin accepting orders for the latest products in its American Liberty series of $100, 1 oz. high relief gold coins and accompanying silver medals, which for the first time will also be struck in high-relief and have a weight of 2.5 ounces. Obverse The obverse design for both products features a left-facing profile of Liberty with flowing hair wearing a headdress with 13 ...
  5. John Mercanti: A Numismatic Legend

    John Mercanti: A Numismatic Legend

    When John M. Mercanti retired as the 12th Chief Engraver of the U.S. Mint, he had accomplished one of the most storied careers in the Mint’s history. He had served as an engraver –sculptor for 37 years. The only engravers to serve longer were George T. Morgan at 48 years, William Barber at 47 years and Frank Gasparro at 39 years. Mercanti also designed, sculpted or engraved over 100 coin and medal designs, more than any other designer in the history of the U.S. Mint. Mr. Mercanti’s U.S. Mint career began in 1974 in the pre-digital age when everything was done by hand and finished at the Mint in 2010 when most of the design work was done with the aid of digital technology. John Mercanti was born on April 27, 1943 in Philadelphia, ...
  6. Commemorating Woodstock: Fifty Years of Peace and Music

    Commemorating Woodstock: Fifty Years of Peace and Music

    Single events seldom define generations, and in the rare cases that they have, they’ve typically been World Wars. In one case, though, a four-day concert did just that. Named for Woodstock, a town located 43 miles from where the event took place, the festival was advertised as “3 Days of Peace & Music.” Fifty years later, it remains so much more than that to those who attended. The Place The event started as the brainchild of Michael Lang, Artie Kornfeld, Joel Rosenman, and John P. Roberts. The four, a combination of entrepreneurs and lawyers, had major clashes in style that, along with various challenges, threatened to end the project. One of those challenges had to do with the venue. The first planned site was in Wallkill, New York, but the town’s residents protested successfully to stop it. Just a month before the event, the organi ...

Collector Tips

  1. Collecting U.S. Coins by Type

    Collecting U.S. Coins by Type

    What is a Type Set? It is neither affordable, nor even possible on an unlimited budget to acquire one of every United States Mint coin ever issued. Since many collectors have a hard time settling on just one series to collect, many collectors decide to build a “type set” of US coins. Type set coin collecting means collecting by design type rather than by date and mint mark. This approach has existed for a long time but became especially popular around 1960. During this time, coin stores were seen in many areas, several major hobby periodicals still issued today were first issued due to this increased interest in coins, and with more people collecting United States Mint coins, it became harder to build complete sets of any one series, which led many collectors to start building the aforementioned type sets.  There are many ways to collect Un ...
  2. The Coca-Cola® Company: An American Success Story

    The Coca-Cola® Company: An American Success Story

    The Coca-Cola® Company: An American Success Story Coming up from humble beginnings in the late 19th century, Coca-Cola® has emerged as the world’s first – and still most recognizable – global brand. The company currently offers its products in all but two countries around the world, Cuba and North Korea, and the only reason that it isn’t available in those two is because of American trade embargoes. People of all ages enjoy the original beverage and its countless offshoots every day. From Humble Origins to Global Phenomenon Coca-Cola’s® story began in Georgia in 1886. After the Civil war, pharmacist John S. Pemberton invented Pemberton’s French Wine Cola, which he made at his d ...
  3. Adolph Weinman: Master Sculptor and Medallic Artist

    Adolph Weinman: Master Sculptor and Medallic Artist

    Every collector of 20th century U.S. coins is familiar with perennially popular Winged Liberty dime and the legendary Walking Liberty half dollar, both of which are among the most widely collected coin series to this day. Both coins debuted in 1916 – as military conflict was exploding in Europe amid growing calls for the U.S. to enter the Great War and economic disruption in the U.S. marked by huge inflationary pressures. Both coins also appealed to the American spirit of optimism and patriotism and were issued the year before the U.S. entered the war, which cemented its role as a global power. Most collectors also know that these celebrated designs are the work of Adolph Weinman, a German-American artist and sculptor who rose to prominence in the early 20th century. To better appreciate Weinman’s numismatic and medallic creations, not to mention his architectural sculpture in breath ...
  4. The Two Largest Gold Coins Ever Minted

    The Two Largest Gold Coins Ever Minted

    Gold has been in the news recently as spot prices hit a six-year high, reaching more than $1440 per ounce. Gold has also been in the headlines recently because of news related to the world’s two largest gold coins. The Largest Gold Coin in the World: 1 Ton Gold Kangaroo The first is the 2011 One Ton Australian Kangaroo gold coin created by the Perth Mint in Western Australia to showcase the mint’s popular gold Kangaroo series that began in 1989.  The coin, whose reverse design of a bounding red kangaroo surrounded by stylized rays of sunlight was created by Stuart Devlin, is ...
  5. 8 Hard-to-Find American Silver Eagle Coins: Do you have these Key Dates?

    8 Hard-to-Find American Silver Eagle Coins: Do you have these Key Dates?

    American Silver Eagles serve as the backbone of many collections around the world. While other countries began issuing silver bullion coins earlier, the Silver Eagle’s status as the only annual modern silver bullion series backed for weight and purity by the US government earned it preeminent status in the numismatic world. In the year that the bullion series began, so, too, did the proof series. Although proof mintages are just a small fraction of the bullion ones, they are popular among many collectors. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Silver Eagle in 2006, the U.S Mint began issuing burnished Silver ...
  6. NGC Teams Up With American Hero Charlie Duke

    NGC Teams Up With American Hero Charlie Duke

    In 1969, the world watched in awe as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first men ever to set foot on the surface of the moon. Tears came to the eyes of many as the rock that is over 200,000 miles away seemed just a little bit closer. So, too, by extension, did the rest of the universe. Now, Mints around the world are celebrating the 50th anniversary of that first lunar visit, and Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) is contributing to the festivities through their partnership with astronaut Charlie Duke. Early Life Charlie Duke was born in North Carolina and grew up in South Carolina and Florida. After graduating from Admiral Farragut Academy in St. Petersburg as the school’s valedictorian, he entered the US Naval Academy, from which he graduated in 1957. He then entered ...